• Ernie Ball
  • MusicMan
  • Sterling by MusicMan

JD003

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2022
Messages
19
Location
Nashville TN
However I think it is now likely there is a great deal less money in pure songwriting than there was twenty years ago before the advent of web based downloads. This could affect the quality.

Not exactly sure what you mean by "pure" songwriting. I think I get it.

I haven't been networking or pitching for 15 years+. But as someone who came to Nashville to pursue song writing, I learned pretty quick the landscape had changed dramatically and quickly. Over and over I heard about the days when a relatively small publishing house might have 10 to 20 writers on salary. Some hit makers, some being developed. It was common for publishers to sign someone they saw something in even if they knew it might be a few years developing them and plugging them into the co-writing scene. Those same kinds of publishers now might only have 2 or 3 writers.

I think it affects the quality of music we hear, certainly the diversity. Every heart tells a slightly different story.

The big houses and record companies that sign writers are primarily looking for those that have artist potential. In this town they used to say, "you don't play guitar that good, cant sing much better, You're a writer!" More and more everyone is looking for a writer who could be a star. Keeping more of the royalty pie.

The last meeting I had with a publisher who's attention I had managed to get actually came to my house and listened to songs. In the end he said, "you're close but I don't hear a hit, and you not outwriting the 2 guys I got" I'll have to pass. Best of luck to you."

I had to let it go. I have real job now. Still write though because I still hear voices. ;)
 

alf cockle

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
381
Location
montreal,canada,ormond beach,fla
Yes,there,s another gunslinger in every town...one Canadian ,who was,and is phenominal is Colin James....probably ,relatively unknown,globally...never got the big break in the good ole U.S.of A,I guess.Joe Bonamassa is looking awfully good..
 

vatedome04

New member
Joined
Jan 6, 2023
Messages
1
Location
india
In recent years, old music has sold better than new. There's a psychological reason for it: Familiar music actually feels better to audiences. In numerous scientific experiments, researchers have shown that subjects are much more likely to report positive feelings from a given piece of music if they've heard it before.

myfiosgateway.one

mobdro
 
Last edited:

Moonshot

Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2022
Messages
5
Location
Baltimore
I consider myself relatively young at 35 but I subscribe to Rick Beato’s reasoning that it wasn’t better per se but was more interesting in that popular music had more musically interesting arrangements with key changes, tempo changes, complicated chords…etc. things today are generally more formulaic due to changes in the industry
 

Lax

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2010
Messages
279
Location
Nice, France
Honestly from my European guy point of view, I think the basic code of pop music has been roughly the same for 40 years, from reusing older songs, using ultra common chords progressions or interpolation...
Other than production sound I think what makes us think it was better is the quantity, if you hear 2000 songs that aren't innovative you'll get the feeling people were more creative in the days, because it took less songs for you to be surprised musically.
 
Top Bottom