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Smallmouth_Bass

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Sep 25, 2007
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Montreal, Canada
I don't think it is realistic to expect a complete instrument (re)design to be innovative. For the most part, the innovations come in the refinements and details. I think a bass has to be significantly familiar for players to accept it and for it to be commercially viable. And, as mentioned, ergonomics can vary greatly from player to player. For example, my string spacing preference is 18mm at the bridge, but others swear by 19mm and others like it tighter. There's no right or wrong, but it is impossible to offer every possibility.
 

pacop

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Dec 28, 2014
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Spain
I don't post much (as can be see by by less than 10 posts in the 4 years I've joined the forum), but when I noticed this thread I felt compelled to join in the conversation.

First, I have to say that in my opinion, the Bongo was one of the most innovative designs I've seen in bass guitar over the last decade (for the reasons BP and others have mentioned in this thread) and I absolutely love it! The looks, the playability, the freatures, the ergos just work for me. When I think of EBMM basses, I think of the Stingray, the Sterling, and the Bongo as the iconic designs. It would be a shame if the Bongo were to be discontinued.

Personally, I think that EBMM is a very innovative company, especially when compared to other major manufacturers. This is one of the characteristics of the company that I appreciate. Unfortunately, many musicians tend to be conservative and are slow to adopt to change. Remember the history of the Les Paul? It was a commercial failure at launch and was discontinued. It took time for it to catch on, and now it is one of most iconic guitars on the market today. I am hopeful that some of EBMM's novel designs will reach the same status.

BP and company - please keep doing what you are doing. FWIW, I for one appreciate it tremendously.

+1
 

steevo

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Oct 1, 2009
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395
Location
West Midlands, UK
I don't post much (as can be see by by less than 10 posts in the 4 years I've joined the forum), but when I noticed this thread I felt compelled to join in the conversation.

First, I have to say that in my opinion, the Bongo was one of the most innovative designs I've seen in bass guitar over the last decade (for the reasons BP and others have mentioned in this thread) and I absolutely love it! The looks, the playability, the freatures, the ergos just work for me. When I think of EBMM basses, I think of the Stingray, the Sterling, and the Bongo as the iconic designs. It would be a shame if the Bongo were to be discontinued.

Personally, I think that EBMM is a very innovative company, especially when compared to other major manufacturers. This is one of the characteristics of the company that I appreciate. Unfortunately, many musicians tend to be conservative and are slow to adopt to change. Remember the history of the Les Paul? It was a commercial failure at launch and was discontinued. It took time for it to catch on, and now it is one of most iconic guitars on the market today. I am hopeful that some of EBMM's novel designs will reach the same status.

BP and company - please keep doing what you are doing. FWIW, I for one appreciate it tremendously.
Every guitar took time to catch on in those days though, thats why there wasnt many strats, teles or lp's made because people didnt know what to make of them as a concept.
A lot of new ideas that have come out since the 80's have failed because they are gimmicks that arent tried and tested, the bond guitar comes to mind with the stepped fretboard.
Personally i think EBMM would be better spending more money on getting instruments in stores and having a bigger presence. The number of guitars ive seen in the uk is disappointing and im sure it would boost sales if more of the guitar playing public could see them in the flesh, thats how i ended up with my silo and sterling 5.

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
 

JOEinCA

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Mar 12, 2013
Messages
99
Location
Fresno, CA USA
Dont ever change what you do, please.

I think the fact people want more from you in terms of instruments is a big compliment because EBMM are one of the few instrument makers who do offer genuine innovation. Its not so much that people dont think what you do is enough, its that you guys are capable of pulling off what most makers cant, classic looks, great sounds and features that work instead of being gimmicks. No reason to change that at all.

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

Well said!
 

Meypelnek

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Oct 17, 2013
Messages
156
Location
Munich, Germany
Interesting thread.
I remember when I saw the Bongo for the first time ever: I was shocked and excited (and by that timethought I'd never be able to afford one)! Never a bass design was such a statement. Okay, let's forget about stringed Jack Daniels bottles ...

I have had the Reflex and the Big Al and am very happy with the Bongo and the Sterling HH, today ... looking to get back a Big Al 5 with maple board some time (I really regret I did let it go).

To be honest and fair: I think EBMM has done all you can do when it comes to innovative basses. What more could you ask for than the Game Changer? Or even the Big Al? I know so many bass players who dislike active electronics, who are picky with the body shape, who already have problems with two volume and one tone pot. Thus, I fully understand that all these great models had to be discontinued.
And I wonder what the Majesty Bass could be all about! You can of course spend a lot of time and money on research regarding the best possible player comfort, tone and handling, but will the customers pay for it? Look at Fender's Dimension Bass. How many years have they spent on its development (not that these are anywhere near perfect ...!) - and what a poor reception these basses get. In summary: Develop a bass with the perfect ergonomy, electronics and tone and still so many will ask for a Classic Ray, I suppose.
 

JayDawg

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Joined
Feb 21, 2010
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Sterling, Colorado
I have been in and out of the hospital since May 7th and haven't been able to play at all since then. This Sunday will be my first time back at church playing since my hospitalization and I will be playing one of my Bongos. I thinking the BFR roasted neck as she is my favorite. Plus everyone at church loves my Bongos. People always come up to me after service and say what a unique looking bass it is and they love how it sounds.
 

JayDawg

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Feb 21, 2010
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wow get well and stay well

Thanks BP! I'm doing much better now. But while I was down, I missed my Bongos so now it is catch up time with them. When I pulled out the one to start playing again, I didn't realize how much I have missed playing these things. They are amazing instruments.
 

dmarotta

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Joined
Aug 4, 2007
Messages
190
Location
Thousand Oaks
Our job and mantra is to make tools for artists. We only hope that artists desire innovation. We also provide choices....Do you want us to be an ice cream shop that is forbidden from making a better vanilla? We have to have a well rounded line to survive.


Time for me to chime in on this thread. As a long time session guy I have to show up with basses that are familiar to the producer. For years I brought Fender basses to sessions along with Musicman and other basses. I was never comfortable with the shapes of Fender necks yet I had to use them if that is what the producer wanted to hear.Musicman neck shapes have always felt like a comfortable old shoe to me.Recently I did some videos of the Caprice and Cutlass. I had never played theses basses prior to the video shoot and when I played them there was a familiar feel as the shapes of these necks are taken from the Bongo and Sterling basses which I love so the videos you see were done on basses I had zero time on.
So as Big Poppa says , "We make instruments for artists. We provide choices." For me I can provide that P (Cutlass) and PJ (Caprice)sound on an instrument that plays like butter. So for those of you that dont think this is innovation, consider it as evolution of the P and PJ sound on an instrument that has the playability and build quality of a Musicman.
 
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