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Faulty Stingray 5

Roblevybass

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Nov 14, 2019
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1
Hi. This is my first ever post.
My Stingray 5 has stopped working, and my local luthier is unable to diagnose the fault. The soldered connections to the input jack seem intact. I have put a fresh battery in. On my last gig I managed to get a signal by pushing the jack plug to one side and taping the lead to the bass to maintain the (somewhat tenuous!) connection.
My question is: is the fault more likely to be caused by a faulty input jack, a failed pre-amp, or a loose connection elsewhere?
All suggestions welcome!
Thanks, people...
 

Daniel

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Apr 21, 2016
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San Luis Obispo
Hi. This is my first ever post.
My Stingray 5 has stopped working, and my local luthier is unable to diagnose the fault. The soldered connections to the input jack seem intact. I have put a fresh battery in. On my last gig I managed to get a signal by pushing the jack plug to one side and taping the lead to the bass to maintain the (somewhat tenuous!) connection.
My question is: is the fault more likely to be caused by a faulty input jack, a failed pre-amp, or a loose connection elsewhere?
All suggestions welcome!
Thanks, people...

Hi there, It sounds like you may have an issue with your input jack. Shoot me an email at [email protected] with your guitar's serial number and I'll help you out.
 

Golem

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Aug 30, 2005
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My Place
Did the problem start when you
switched to a different cable ?
If so, go back to your old cable
and see what happens.

My experience with many, many
cables yields two distinct cables
to avoid:

1. Monster Cables can sometimes
fuggup an output jack.
2. Metal clad 90 degr plugs seem
to make tenuous contact. Molded
plastic ones are no problem.
 

danny-79

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Feb 6, 2009
Messages
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England U.K
Did the problem start when you
switched to a different cable ?
If so, go back to your old cable
and see what happens.

My experience with many, many
cables yields two distinct cables
to avoid:

1. Monster Cables can sometimes
fuggup an output jack.
2. Metal clad 90 degr plugs seem
to make tenuous contact. Molded
plastic ones are no problem.

Why do you say that about Monster cable ? I’ve got a couple and never had an issue.
90deg jacks and straight metal jacks. I switched to using Neutrick jack plugs with VD cable a couple of years now, wireless and lead.
Just interested to what you mean on the jacks causing damage to the input and how they could do that (apart from using a straight plug and bashing it)
 
Last edited:

tbonesullivan

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Aug 24, 2012
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Location
New Jersey
One of the ways that some companies accomplished "better contact" was to make the plugs slightly bigger, or change the geometry of the tip. This can end up bending things inside the jack, making it unable to detect when things are plugged in. Right angle plugs also can put a lot more angular stress on the jack.
 

danny-79

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Feb 6, 2009
Messages
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Location
England U.K
One of the ways that some companies accomplished "better contact" was to make the plugs slightly bigger, or change the geometry of the tip. This can end up bending things inside the jack, making it unable to detect when things are plugged in. Right angle plugs also can put a lot more angular stress on the jack.

Ok thanks for that, that makes sense.
The only right angle plug I’m using is on my wireless, very light cable, figured right angle plugs would be better as they are less likely to get bumped about, and I always loop around the strap when using a lead.
 

danny-79

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Feb 6, 2009
Messages
2,385
Location
England U.K
Are you saying that straight cables work better?

That’s how I’m reading it.
If the cable is supported, looped around your strap, there is no weight on it so it really shouldn’t matter what style jack plug you use

(It’s a pet hate of mine people that plug in with out putting the lead around the strap, and leaving the weight of the cable hanging down. Then the lead gets trodden on and, you know the rest)
 

five7

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Joined
Nov 24, 2008
Messages
4,269
90 degree are the best, straight ones are easy to break and cause damage.
 
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