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brash47

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 25, 2018
Messages
187
I made the first No reply.
I personally like a few of the headless and even fanned fret offerings currently out there.

For me, EBMM has a formula that works. There is a tradition and look that is EBMM, even the radical Bongo design (of which i have 3 now) is still definitely EBMM.

Alot of thought goes into a brand and making that brand universally known. Even if they did do this, I would hope they would partner with someone (as they did on the Bongo) to make it a sensible item for EBMM to produce and sell. With a long term look ahead.

But in the end, I do not think it would have the same "ICONIC" feel, look, or sound that is synonymous with EBMM.

There are plenty of musical instrument brands out there doing this. EBMM is a niche offering, but an amazing niche offering that is "iconic".

But with its "icon" status is its classic instrument status. I haven't seen people asking or clamoring for a headless Fender Jazz, Fender Precision and such EBMM is at this status. You go to EBMM looking for those particular products...Stingray, Sterling, Bongo. I just do not think it would sell. And in the end....that is the big picture. Don't produce something that isn't going to sell.

Brash

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MarcMurder

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2014
Messages
51
Location
El Paso, TX
I made the first No reply.
I personally like a few of the headless and even fanned fret offerings currently out there.

For me, EBMM has a formula that works. There is a tradition and look that is EBMM, even the radical Bongo design (of which i have 3 now) is still definitely EBMM.

Alot of thought goes into a brand and making that brand universally known. Even if they did do this, I would hope they would partner with someone (as they did on the Bongo) to make it a sensible item for EBMM to produce and sell. With a long term look ahead.

But in the end, I do not think it would have the same "ICONIC" feel, look, or sound that is synonymous with EBMM.

There are plenty of musical instrument brands out there doing this. EBMM is a niche offering, but an amazing niche offering that is "iconic".

But with its "icon" status is its classic instrument status. I haven't seen people asking or clamoring for a headless Fender Jazz, Fender Precision and such EBMM is at this status. You go to EBMM looking for those particular products...Stingray, Sterling, Bongo. I just do not think it would sell. And in the end....that is the big picture. Don't produce something that isn't going to sell.

Brash

Sent from my SM-G988U using Tapatalk

Fwiw I assume people don't clamor about a fanned p or j because they exist
 

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brash47

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 25, 2018
Messages
187
Getting into fanned is a different thing. I was purely referring to the headless bass. I have enjoyed fanned fret basses and wouldn't mind one. But again, selling them is a different thing.

But I don't believe the basses in your pics are produced by Fender?



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MarcMurder

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2014
Messages
51
Location
El Paso, TX
No, they aren't, we both know fender doesn't make them.
But nobody is asking for a fanned p or j because they exist and can be purchased.
The closest we have to an ebmm is a Samuel Martyn from Brazil.
 

MarcMurder

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2014
Messages
51
Location
El Paso, TX
I would like to ammend my statement about headless instruments when saying that I couldn't see any benefits other than weight and balance distribution. I got to work with a buddy who lives for headless instruments like I do for multislace. We got to talking about the instruments themselves and I was complaining that I love my 37 scale but I hate buying strings for it & I love Cobalts too much.

For those who don't know EB string won't work on some multi scale because length

Anyway he had a 37 headless and I brought a few packs of Cobalts. Since there was no Peg to wind around it fit.


Tl;dr
I support headless basses and am now on the train for a multi scale/ multi scale & headless as long as I can use these Cobalts. And I mean this in a serious functional way, not in a 80s flair way, even though the first color I'd get would be pink
 

DoublebassTim

Member
Joined
May 4, 2017
Messages
24
The funny thing was for a period of time the Stingray was thought of as the ugly bass by some (not me). People could not get pass the P or Jazz bass look. That later change as it became popular in the 90s again. Then the bongo bass came along and was very weird looking a some people (again not me). If any company can make a bass and push boundary's its EB. I have always admired that big Poppa has tried to push those boundary's. I heard an interview where they tried a wheat board material ( which I would love to hear). What ever type of bass they make it always has a Musicman sound. I think that this would be true for a multi scale, headless. Not everybody likes a headless and that is ok. I would love a headless Stingray with the old school logo of the two Musician with the stripe pants on the teardrop pick guard or smaller on the side of the upper horn.
 
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